$305B Highway Bill Passes Senate

The U.S. Senate late Thursday passed a five-year, $305 billion surface transportation funding bill intended to improve surface transportation infrastructure and make several broad changes to transportation policy, as well as reauthorizing the U.S. Export-Import Bank and allowing for private tax enforcement.

Called the “The Fixing America’s Surface Transportation”, or “FAST, Act”, the legislation passed in a bipartisan 83-16 vote, after passing the House of Representatives earlier in the day, 359-65, and will now go to President Barack Obama to be signed into law. The bill authorizes and funds federal highway and other surface transportation programs through fiscal 2020, helping to provide both certainty and flexibility for state and local governments who rely on federal highway funding, while also working to streamline project approval processes and reform transportation programs, according to legislative statements.

The 1,300-page bill was unveiled Tuesday after a bicameral conference between Senate and House lawmakers, following each chamber’s putting forward a competing six-year bill. It is the first long-term highway bill to pass Congress since 2005.

Among other provisions, the bill expands the funding available for bridges off the National Highway System, eliminates or consolidates at least six offices within the U.S. Department of Transportation and encourages the installation of vehicle-to-infrastructure communication equipment to improve congestion and safety. It would also increase the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration civil penalties cap and makes changes to the auto safety recall process.

Public transit would get an 18 percent funding boost over five years, with dedicated bus funding increased even more. The bill also directs a review intended to help create federal minimum safety standards for public transportation and would make several changes to how Amtrak operates, for instance seeking to reorganize its operations around supporting its “major business lines” and giving states more control over routes through the creation of a State-Supported Route Committee.

It would also allow for the current $200 million liability cap on Amtrak incidents to be adjusted to account for inflation, as well as specifically lifting the cap to $295 million for claims stemming from the deadly May 12 derailment in Philadelphia that killed eight passengers and injured dozens more.

The bill further includes a clause reauthorizing the U.S. Export-Import Bank, that backs exports by U.S. businesses via loans and loan guarantees, through 2019. The bank’s charter had been allowed to lapse in June, amid opposition from several senior lawmakers, most prominently House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling, R-Texas, whose committee is responsible for related legislation.

Opponents argue the bank is an exemplar of “crony capitalism,” but a bipartisan coalition supportive of the bank argues it helps support many domestic jobs and used the rarely-invoked procedural move of a so-called discharge petition to force a bill reauthorizing the bank onto the House floor in October.

To help pay for transportation programs, FAST  reauthorizes the federal gasoline tax through fiscal 2022, although keeps it at the existing 18.3 cents-per-gallon level, where it has remained since 1993. The tax typically brings in around $35 billion each year, but factors such as inflation, increasing fuel economy standards and a decrease in average miles driven each year mean this is not enough to fulfill yearly demand according to legislative history.

Thus, lawmakers have included several other offsets for the bill’s full $305 billion authorization, including an increase in aviation security fees that airline passengers pay, tightened enforcement on certain outstanding taxes — including a controversial provision to raise revenue by requiring the Internal Revenue Service to hire private collection agencies to recoup certain tax debts — and the sale of oil from the federal Strategic Petroleum Reserve.

A clause that has drawn criticism from the banking industry would limit the dividend banks with more than $10 billion in assets are paid on Federal Reserve stock. Banks currently receive a flat 6 percent on this stock, required to be purchased to participate in the Fed system, but would instead receive the lower of 6 percent or a rate equal to the high yield of the 10-year U.S. Treasury note at the most recent note auction. Smaller banks would continue to receive 6 percent.

What Tuesday Means for New Jersey

There are only 18 Democratic governors left across the nation, and the survivors have some theories about why Democrats have been swept out of statehouses all over the country in recent years.

Many of the remaining Democrats are blaming an unpopular president.

In New Jersey on the other hand Democrats picked up four Assembly seats, widening their advantage to 52-28. The Senate is also controlled by Democrats.

State Republicans’ also have theories why New Jersey is bucking the national trend with remaining Republicans blaming an unengaged Governor Christie.

Overall, incumbents were widely re-elected to the Assembly with only a handful of Republican legislators losing to their Democratic challengers. Democrats picked up 4 seats bringing their total to 52, their largest majority in over 30 years. Republicans held onto 28 seats (down from 32). Below are brief summaries of races where at least one new individual was elected to the General Assembly.

–        First Legislative District: ATLANTIC (part) – CAPE MAY – CUMBERLAND (part) Counties

Republican incumbent Sam Fiocchi was defeated by Democrats R. Bruce Land. Democratic incumbent Bob Andrzejczak was re-elected.

–        Fifth Legislative District: CAMDEN (part) – GLOUCESTER (part) Counties

Democrats Arthur Barclay and Patricia Egan Jones handily defeated their Republican opponents, Kevin Ehret and Keith Walker. They will replace outgoing Democratic Assemblymen Gilbert Wilson and Angel Fuetes.

–        Eighth Legislative District: ATLANTIC (part) – BURLINGTON (part) – CAMDEN (part) Counties

Republican Joe Howarth joins his running mate incumbent Maria Rodriguez-Gregg in the Assembly. Both ran unopposed. Howarth is replacing retiring Republican Assemblyman Christopher Brown.

–        Eleventh Legislative District: MONMOUTH (part) Counties

Democrats Eric Houghtaling and Joann Downey narrowly beat their incumbent Republican competitors Mary Pat Angelini and Caroline Casagrande.

–        Sixteenth Legislative District: HUNTERDON (part) – MERCER (part) – MIDDLESEX (part) – SOMERSET (part) Counties

At the time of writing, Democrat Andrew Zwicker was leading incumbent Republican challenger Donna Simon by 29 votes, making it the tightest Assembly race. However, provisional ballots are still being counted, a process that will last until Friday November 6. From there, the losing candidate has until November 14 to file for a  recount. Republican incumbent Jack Ciattarelli was re-elected.

–        Twenty-Second Legislative District: MIDDLESEX (part) – SOMERSET (part) – UNION (part) Counties

Democrat James Kennedy was elected to replace retiring Democratic Assemblywoman Linda Stender. Democratic incumbent Jerry Green was re-elected.

–        Twenty-Fourth Legislative District: MORRIS (part) – SUSSEX – WARREN (part) Counties

Republican Gail Phoebus was elected to replace retiring Republican Assemblywoman Alison McHose. Incumbent Republican F. Parker Space was re-elected.

–        Thirty-First Legislative District: HUDSON (part) Counties

With no incumbents running for re-election in the district, Democrats Angela McKnight and Nicholas Chiaravalloti handily defeated their Republican opponents. They are replacing retiring Democratic Assemblymen Jason O’Donnell and Charles Mainor.

–        Thirty-Third Legislative District: HUDSON (part) Counties

Democrat Annette Chaparro was elected to replace retiring Democratic Assemblyman Carmelo Garcia. Incumbent Democrat Raj Mukherji was re-elected.

In terms of county elections below is a brief summary of newly elected individuals and ballot question results:

–        Atlantic County

Republican Maureen Kern was elected as the 2nd District’s Freeholder. The Republicans swept the elections in Atlantic County and were able to easily maintain their majority on the Board of Chosen Freeholders. Incumbents Dennis Levinson, James Curcio, Frank Formica, and James Bertino were re-elected.

–        Burlington County

Republicans Kate Gibbs and Ryan Peters were elected to the Board of Chosen Freeholders, defeating Democratic incumbents Aimee Belgard and Joanne Schwartz. As such, Democrats lost their majority on the board.

–        Camden County

Democrats Susan Angulo and William Moen Jr. join Democratic incumbents Jeffrey Nash and Jonathan Young Sr. on the Board of Chosen Freeholders. Camden also elected Democrat Gilbert “Whip” Wilson to the position of Sheriff, replacing outgoing Sheriff Charles Billingham.

–        Cumberland County

Newly elected Democrat James Quinn joins Cumberland’s Board of Chosen Freeholders. Incumbent Joseph Derella was re-elected. Overall, Democrats preserve their 4-3 majority.

–        Middlesex County

74% of individuals voted yes to the Public Question “Shall the governing body of the County of Middlesex prioritize funding to programs which provide transportation services for individuals in need of dialysis, chemotherapy or other regular medical services as a means of offsetting recent federal and state funding cuts?”

–        Morris County

Republican newcomers Christine Myers and Deborah Smith, and incumbent Republican John Cesaro were (re) elected to the Morris’ Board of Chosen Freeholders.

–        Passaic County

Democrats swept Passiac County’s Freeholder elections. Newly elected Cassandra Lazzara and incumbents John Bartlett and Hector Lora allowed Democrats to retain control of the board.

–        Salem County

Republican Melissa DeCastro and Democrat Charles V. Hassler remain in an extremely tight race, with DeCastro leading by 11 votes. At the time of writing, provisional ballots were being counted. Regardless of the outcome of this race, Republicans will retain control of the board.

So, the New Jersey Legislature now enters a lame-duck session after this week’s elections with several key questions still needing to be answered.

Among them: – Funding the New Jersey Pension- Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield Omnicre- Out-of-Network, and most critically– Funding for the Transportation Trust Fund.

Serious conversations about raising New Jersey’s gas tax to head off a looming transportation-funding crisis were put on hold earlier this year, so lawmakers could focus on the Assembly elections that were just held in all 40 legislative districts earlier this week. But now with those contests in the rearview mirror, the talk in Trenton has shifted back to transportation.

Lawmakers from both parties said yesterday that they are willing to strike a bipartisan deal to renew the state’s Transportation Trust Fund, which pays for road, bridge, and rail improvements throughout the state, using revenue from the gas tax and other sources, including from borrowing.

The lawmakers also seem to be in agreement that any deal they strike on transportation funding will likely have to involve raising the state’s 14.5-cent gas tax to bring in new revenue, since all of the money coming in from the gas tax is going to pay down debt. The trust fund is also up against its borrowing limit and only has enough money to make it until the end of June 2016.

There are also signs of hope that lawmakers in the Senate, which is also controlled by Democrats, will find common ground on the transportation-funding issue as well. They recently came together to pass a resolution supporting a plan to share costs with the federal government on a new Hudson River train tunnel. But how to convince Christie, who has signed an anti-tax pledge as a GOP presidential candidate this year, to agree to a tax hike in the middle of his presidential campaign remains a big concern. When the issue came up during his monthly call-in radio show on NJ 101.5 FM earlier this week, Christie was noncommittal, saying only that he hasn’t dismissed a gas-tax hike outright.

Lastly, the State must deal with Governor Christie’s Cabinet/Staff Changes that include:

  • Richard Badolato was formally nominated as Commissioner of the Department of Banking and Insurance. He has served as Acting Commissioner since August of this year.
  • Ford Scudder, COO of Laffer Associates, will be nominated to the position of State Treasurer. Current Acting Treasurer, Robert Romano, will be responsible for management and operation of Treasury activities.
  • Richard Hammer, Assistant Commissioner of the New Jersey Department of Transportation, will become that department’s Acting Commissioner. He replaces Jamie Fox.

With it all, there remains the question of how committed Christie will be to solving New Jersey issues as long as he remains in the hunt as a presidential hopeful. Christie is pushing in New Hampshire, where the primary is not held until February.

Martin J. Milita, Jr. Esq., is senior director at Duane Morris Government Strategies, LLC.

Duane Morris Government Strategies (DMGS) supports the growth of organizations, companies, communities and economies through a suite of government and business consulting services. The firm offers a range of government relations and public affairs services, including lobbying, grant writing; development finance consulting, media relations management, grassroots campaigning and community outreach. Milita works at the firm’s Trenton and Newark New Jersey offices.

Visit his blog at: https://martinmilita1.wordpress.com

Follow him on twitter: @MartinMilita1

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Senate To Take Up Short-Term Highway Funding Bill

Martin J. Milita Jr. Esq., senior director at Duane Morris Government Strategies, comments on: Senate and Highway Funding Bill

Washington-based Duane Morris Government Strategies (DMGS) supports the growth of organizations, companies, communities and economies through a suite of government and business consulting services. The firm offers a range of government relations and public affairs services, including lobbying, grant writing; development finance consulting, media relations management, grassroots campaigning and community outreach. Milita works at the firm’s New Jersey offices.

Senate To Take Up Short-Term Highway Funding Bill

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., on Tuesday said that the Senate will take up a short-term highway funding extension to allow time for negotiations on a comprehensive bicameral bill, as the Senate continues debate on its long-term highway funding legislation.

The Senate intends to take up the $8 billion, three-month extension, extending authorization for highway funding through October, if and when it passes the House, allowing for a bicameral conference in September to develop a final long-term highway bill, McConnell told reporters.

The Senate is still set to vote on its own six-year highway funding bill, the Developing a Reliable and Innovative Vision for the Economy, or Drive, Act, on Thursday, but any final vote will now likely be academic.

McConnell had been scrambling to get the bill through the Senate so it can be considered by the House before lawmakers leave on their summer recess and Highway Trust Fund authorization expires on July 31. But House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., had at first been noncommittal and then bluntly against the bill, as senators adopted an amendment to reauthorize the Export-Import Bank of the United States.

Reauthorizing the bank’s charter, which expired at the end of June, has won strong support across both parties in the Senate, but has faced a more hostile reception in the House, amid claims that it supports “corporate welfare.” Instead, McCarthy and other senior House Republicans pushed the Senate to take up a five-month highway funding extension, then the three-month extension put forward late on Monday, to allow the House time to come up with its own long-term highway funding plan and go to conference with the Senate.

The three-month extension, H.R. 3236, the Surface Transportation and Veterans Health Care Choice Improvement Act, is expected to get a vote in the House on Wednesday. In addition to $8 billion in funding for the Highway Trust Fund — the same amount that had been in the previous five-month extension — the short-term bill also includes more than $3 billion in emergency funding to prevent a shortfall that may have forced several U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs hospitals to shutter temporarily.

Negotiators will likely have a lot to discuss before coming up with a final bicameral bill, with the Senate bill having generated significant debate both within and outside Congress, both for some of its policy provisions and for its proposed methods of keeping the Highway Trust Fund full.

The bill is intended to provide six years of funding and authorization for the trust fund, used to reimburse state and local governments for highway and other surface transportation infrastructure spending.

Currently, the trust fund pulls in about $35 billion a year from the federal gasoline tax — a significant sum, but more than $10 billion a year short of the necessary funding, with gas tax revenue having been eaten into by increasing fuel economy standards and inflation. Efforts to raise the gas tax, last increased in 1993, have proven politically unpalatable, so McConnell and Senate Environment and Public Works Committee ranking member Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., instead sought to put together a $47 billion package of offsets in the Drive Act that would augment the fund for at least three years.

These would include tweaks to tax enforcement, extensions to Transportation Security Administration fees and government guarantee fees for mortgages underlying mortgage-backed securities, and the indexing of customs user fees to inflation, among other pay-fors.

But several of the proposed offsets have drawn criticism, including the two largest, a proposed sell-off of 100 million barrels of oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve and a cut to the interest rate paid by the Federal Reserve on stock that banks are required to purchase to participate in the Fed system, for banks with $1 billion or more in assets.

Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee Chairwoman Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, has slammed the proposed Strategic Petroleum Reserve sell-off as the wrongful use of a strategic asset as a “slush fund,” and representatives from the banking industry have come out against the dividend cut, which would drop the rate paid from 6 percent to 1.5 percent. They argue, among other things, that the interest is needed to compensate for otherwise useful capital being tied up.

This Week In Congress: Highways & Education

Last week the Armed Services Committee held a confirmation hearing for Marine Corps General Joe Dunford to be chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The hearing went well, and the committee could seek to consider and report the nomination this week, although no markup is currently scheduled. If General Dunford is reported by the committee, prompt action by the full Senate is possible, though a confirmation vote is more likely next week.

This week, the House returns on Monday and will tackle six bills under suspension of the rules, primarily from the Small Business Committee.

On Tuesday, the House deals with 14 suspension bills, all of them having been reported by the Financial Services Committee. On Wednesday and Thursday, the House will tackle H.R. 2898, the Western Water and American Food Security Act of 2015, introduced by Rep. David Valadao, R-Calif. The bill provides a response to the drought afflicting the West, especially California, source of much of the country’s food. Of interest to note is the absence on the agenda of the patent-litigation reform bill, H.R. 9. That bill had been included for action this week in Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy’s planned floor schedule for the month. While a similar bill passed last Congress with 325 votes, the failure to consider the bill as scheduled this week may portend underlying issues with the bill, or it may be due to something as simple as a delay in getting a score from the Congressional Budget Office. Nonetheless, its absence from this week’s schedule is worthy of note.

The Senate resumes consideration on Monday of S. 1177, the Every Child Achieves Act, the bipartisan bill developed by the Education Committee chairman, Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., and the committee’s ranking member, Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), also known as No Child Left Behind. Last week, the chamber worked its way through amendments to the bill. The chamber’s work on this legislation reflects another instance of Leader Mitch McConnell’s effort to restore regular order to the workings of the body, after several years of dysfunction. This week, the Senate is expected to complete its consideration of the bill. Last week, the House passed its version of the bill to reauthorize the ESEA. Senate passage will allow both chambers to begin the process of reconciling the two bills, which are quite different.

Upon completion of the Every Child Achieves Act, the majority leader has signaled his intention to turn to consideration of the highway bill. The current program, operating under a short-term extension passed earlier in the spring, expires at the end of July and must be renewed. Congress will not go into its August recess, the height of road-building and repair season, without extending the program. As has been the case for many years now, the challenge is figuring out how to pay for the infrastructure programs included in the highway bill. Proposals to raise the gas tax have not won support from Republican leaders in either chamber. The leading proposal has been to use receipts from the repatriation of earnings being held overseas by American companies due to the noncompetitively high U.S. corporate tax rate. This repatriation option has numerous proponents, but many senators want to reserve the funds from a repatriation for broader tax reform. In the face of this stalemate, Leader McConnell has again expressed his expectation that the Senate will have to adopt another short-term renewal, to be paid for from general receipts. Although Democrats have resisted another short-term extension, they are likely to have few viable alternatives.

As has been widely discussed for weeks, the highway bill, which is must-pass legislation, is the likely vehicle for consideration of the reauthorization of the Export-Import Bank, which technically expired at the end of June. In a test vote last month, more than 60 senators voted in favor of extending the bank’s charter. Inclusion of the bank’s reauthorization will make a short-term highway bill more palatable to Democrats in both chambers.

This week committees on both sides of the capitol will hold a number of high-profile hearings. On Tuesday, the House Foreign Affairs Committee has scheduled a hearing on the Iran Nuclear Agreement, which was supposed to have been achieved by last week but, as of this writing, remains under negotiation. Also on Tuesday, a Foreign Affairs Subcommittee will hold a hearing on the EU Outlook, a topic garnering unusual attention in light of the Greek debt crisis and the potential for Greece to default and be forced out of the Euro. Staying with the Foreign Affairs Committee, two of its subcommittees will hold a hearing on Thursday on U.S.-China Nuclear Cooperation.

Federal Reserve Board Chairwoman Janet Yellen provides her semi-annual testimony to the House Financial Services Committee on Wednesday and to the Senate Banking Committee on Thursday. Senate Banking also holds an oversight hearing on Wednesday with Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Director Richard Cordray.

Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson appears before the House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday. On Wednesday, that committee will hear from Howard Shelanski, the director of the little-known but singularly powerful White House Office of Regulatory Affairs (OIRA), which oversees the federal government’s regulatory apparatus. The OIRA director also appears before the Regulatory Affairs Subcommittee of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee on Thursday.

Other hearings of note this week include a two-part hearing on criminal justice reform in the House Oversight Committee, a hearing on radicalization in the House Homeland Security Committee, a hearing on welfare reform in the House Ways and Means Committee, a hearing on the Export-Import Bank in the House Oversight Committee, and a hearing of a Senate Commerce subcommittee on Wednesday looking into international soccer issues, in the wake of the recent indictment of FIFA officials.

On committee’s markup agendas, the House Appropriations Committee will mark up the Homeland Security appropriations bill on Tuesday. The bill contains language that would block any funds from implementing President Obama’s November 2014 executive actions, currently enjoined by the courts, to postpone indefinitely the deportation of immigrants in the country illegally. On Wednesday, the Senate Commerce Committee will mark up the highway-safety portion of the highway bill just as the bill is likely to come to the floor.

A list of scheduled committee hearings is included below.

—By Martin J. Milita, Jr., Esq. Senior Director

Visit his blog at: https://martinmilita1.wordpress.com

Follow him on twitter: @MartinMilita1

https://www.facebook.com/martin.milita

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Please feel free to contact the author or your other Duane Morris Government Strategies LLC contact to learn more about this article and what it may mean to you.

About Duane Morris Government Strategies, LLC (DMGS):

Comprised of 19 experienced professionals representing U.S. and foreign clients at the federal, state and local levels, DMGS is as an ancillary business of international law firm Duane Morris LLP, one of the 100 largest law firms with more than 700 attorneys in the U.S. as well as in the UK and Asia. The firm operates in eight offices including Newark, NJ; Trenton, NJ; Albany, NY; Harrisburg, PA; Philadelphia, PA; Pittsburgh, PA; Columbus, OH; and Washington, DC.

DMGS offers a full range of government relations and public affairs services, including lobbying, grant identification/writing/administration, development finance consulting, procurement, grassroots campaigning, public relations, and crisis planning/crisis management needs.

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CALENDAR

Monday, July 13, 2015

Senate Committees

Traffic Congestion and Commerce Issues

Senate Small Business and Entrepreneurship

Full Committee Field Hearing

July 13, 3:30 p.m., Livingston Parish Council Chamber, 20355 Government Blvd., Livingston, La.

Tuesday, July 14, 2015

House Committees

Fiscal 2016 Appropriations: Homeland Security

House Appropriations

Full Committee Markup

10:15 a.m., 2359 Rayburn Bldg.

Broadband Infrastructure Investment

House Energy and Commerce – Subcommittee on Communications and Technology

Subcommittee Hearing

10 a.m., 2322 Rayburn Bldg.

Pipeline Safety

House Energy and Commerce – Subcommittee on Energy and Power

Subcommittee Hearing

10:15 a.m., 2123 Rayburn Bldg.

Federal Reserve Oversight

House Financial Services – Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations

Subcommittee Hearing

10 a.m., 2128 Rayburn Bldg.

Iran Nuclear Agreement

House Foreign Affairs

Full Committee Hearing

10 a.m., 2172 Rayburn Bldg.

Maritime Border Security

House Homeland Security – Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security

Subcommittee Hearing

10 a.m., 311 Cannon Bldg.

DHS Oversight

House Judiciary

Full Committee Oversight Hearing

10 a.m., 2141 Rayburn Bldg.

Seismic Surveying in Outer Continental Shelf

House Natural Resources – Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources

Subcommittee Oversight Hearing

10 a.m., 1324 Longworth Bldg.

Federal Land Management Bills

House Natural Resources – Subcommittee on Federal Lands

Subcommittee Hearing

10:30 a.m., 1334 Longworth Bldg.

Criminal Justice Reforms

House Oversight and Government Reform

Full Committee Hearing

9:45 a.m., 2154 Rayburn Bldg.

Commercial Weather Data

House Science, Space and Technology – Subcommittee on Environment

Subcommittee Hearing

10 a.m., 2318 Rayburn Bldg.

Health Care Measures

House Veterans’ Affairs – Subcommittee on Health

Subcommittee Hearing

10 a.m., 334 Cannon Bldg.

Medicare Prescription Drug Program

House Energy and Commerce – Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations

Subcommittee Hearing

2 p.m., 2322 Rayburn Bldg.

Tunisia Political Assessment

House Foreign Affairs – Subcommittee on the Middle East and North Africa

Subcommittee Hearing

2 p.m., 2172 Rayburn Bldg.

European Union Outlook

House Foreign Affairs – Subcommittee on Europe, Eurasia and Emerging Threats

Subcommittee Hearing

2 p.m., 2200 Rayburn Bldg.

Weapons of Mass Destruction

House Homeland Security – Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection and Security Technologies; House Homeland Security – Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response and Communications

Subcommittees Joint Hearing

2 p.m., 311 Cannon Bldg.

Senate Committees

Armed Services Nominations

Senate Armed Services

Full Committee Confirmation Hearing

9:30 a.m., G50 Dirksen Bldg.

Disease Research

Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation – Subcommittee on Space, Science and Competitiveness

Subcommittee Hearing

10 a.m., 253 Russell Bldg.

Islanded Energy Systems

Senate Energy and Natural Resources

Full Committee Hearing

10 a.m., 366 Dirksen Bldg.

Intelligence Briefing

Senate Select Intelligence

Full Committee Closed Briefing

2:30 p.m., 219 Hart Bldg.

Small Business Energy Development and Manufacturing

Senate Small Business and Entrepreneurship

Full Committee Hearing

2:30 p.m., 428A Russell Bldg.

Wednesday, July 15, 2015

House Committees

Land Grant Universities

House Agriculture

Full Committee Hearing

10 a.m., 1300 Longworth Bldg.

Monetary Policy and Economic Assessment

House Financial Services

Full Committee Hearing

10 a.m., HVC-210 Capitol Visitor Center

U.S. Counterterrorism Assessment

House Homeland Security

Full Committee Hearing

10 a.m., 311 Cannon Bldg.

Fracking on Federal Lands

House Natural Resources – Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources

Subcommittee Oversight Hearing

10 a.m., 1324 Longworth Bldg.

Criminal Justice Reforms

House Oversight and Government Reform

Full Committee Hearing

10 a.m., 2154 Rayburn Bldg.

National Weather Service Misconduct Allegations

House Science, Space and Technology

Full Committee Hearing

10 a.m., 2318 Rayburn Bldg.

Small Businesses’ Drone Use

House Small Business

Full Committee Hearing

11 a.m., 2360 Rayburn Bldg.

VA Employee Disciplinary Issues

House Veterans’ Affairs

Full Committee Markup

10 a.m., 334 Cannon Bldg.

VA Unemployability Benefits

House Veterans’ Affairs

Full Committee Hearing

10:30 a.m., 334 Cannon Bldg.

TANF Renewal and Welfare Proposals

House Ways and Means – Subcommittee on Human Resources

Subcommittee Hearing

10:30 a.m., 1100 Longworth Bldg.

SNAP Strategies

House Agriculture – Subcommittee on Nutrition

Subcommittee Hearing

1:30 p.m., 1300 Longworth Bldg.

Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs

House Judiciary – Subcommittee on Regulatory Reform, Commercial and Antitrust Law

Subcommittee Oversight Hearing

3 p.m., 2141 Rayburn Bldg.

Tribal Land and Economic Development

House Natural Resources – Subcommittee on Indian, Insular and Alaska Native Affairs

Subcommittee Hearing

2 p.m., 1324 Longworth Bldg.

Interior Department Cybersecurity

House Oversight and Government Reform – Subcommittee on Information Technology; House Oversight and Government Reform – Subcommittee on the Interior

Committee Joint Hearing

2 p.m., 2154 Rayburn Bldg.

Senate Committees

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Report

Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs

Full Committee Hearing

10 a.m., 538 Dirksen Bldg.

Transportation and Consumer Protection Measure

Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation

Full Committee Markup

10 a.m., 253 Russell Bldg.

Maritime Border Security

Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs

Full Committee Hearing

10 a.m., 342 Dirksen Bldg.

International Soccer Overview

Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation – Subcommittee on Consumer Protection, Product Safety, Insurance and Data Security

Subcommittee Hearing

2:30 p.m., 253 Russell Bldg.

Indian Country Juvenile Justice

Senate Indian Affairs

Full Committee Oversight Hearing

2:15 p.m., 628 Dirksen Bldg.

Diabetes Research

Senate Special Aging

Full Committee Hearing

2:15 p.m., G-50 Dirksen Bldg.

Thursday, July 16, 2015

House Committees

U.S.-China Nuclear Cooperation

House Foreign Affairs – Subcommittee on Asia and the Pacific; House Foreign Affairs – Subcommittee on Terrorism, Nonproliferation, and Trade

Subcommittees Joint Hearing

9 a.m., 2172 Rayburn Bldg.

Federal Air Marshal Assessment

House Homeland Security – Subcommittee on Transportation Security

Subcommittee Hearing

10 a.m., 311 Cannon Bldg.

Senate Committees

Monetary Policy Report

Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs

Full Committee Hearing

2:30 p.m., 538 Dirksen Bldg.

Wildlife Poaching

Senate Foreign Relations – Subcommittee on Africa and Global Health Policy

Subcommittee Hearing

2 p.m., 419 Dirksen Bldg.

Forest and Timber Issues

Senate Energy and Natural Resources – Subcommittee on Public Lands, Forests and Mining

Subcommittee Hearing

2:45 p.m., 366 Dirksen Bldg.

Regulatory Process

Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs – Subcommittee on Regulatory Affairs and Federal Management

Subcommittee Hearing

2 p.m., 342 Dirksen Bldg.

Intelligence Briefing

Senate Select Intelligence

Full Committee Closed Briefing