New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie Absolute Veto- “Made in America Bill”.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie on Thursday vetoed a package of bills that would have required the use of U.S.-manufactured goods for a greater number of public contracts, including 50% US. sourced components, contending that the measures would hurt international development and increase costs for the public.

New Jersey already requires U.S.-manufactured goods for public works contracts, local public contracts, state construction contracts and local school contracts, but S1881 — which the state Legislature sent to the governor in December — would have covered all state contracts, including those of state universities. Companion bills sought to impose similar requirements on four bi-state agencies: the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission, Delaware River Port Authority, and Delaware River and Bay Authority.

Christie said in his veto messages that the bills would “constrain purchasing decisions by setting artificial thresholds of reasonableness based almost exclusively on price.”

As a strong indicator where he stands on corporate inversions, Christie also had kind words for foreign-headquartered companies, which he said are responsible for more than 225,000 jobs in the state.

“These global companies seek global marketplaces that will support their investments. Those companies, in turn, infuse billions of dollars into New Jersey’s economy, not only in direct investment and jobs, but indirectly to thousands of other New Jersey businesses that provide goods and services to support their operations,” the governor said. “In stark contrast, these bills will chill international development and increase costs borne by taxpayers.”

While lawmakers tried to build flexibility into the proposed requirements by allowing public entities to secure waivers if U.S.-made products weren’t available or were too expensive, Christie said the end result would have been a more-complex bidding process and more-burdensome reporting requirements.

“Rather than helping Americans, these bills will simply drive up the price of doing business, and threaten job creation,” the governor said. “Building economic walls around our state, or our nation, will not improve the lives of our citizens.”

In a statement, Senate President Steve Sweeney, D-Gloucester, stated that  the veto was  a missed opportunity to support domestic businesses.

“The ‘made in America’ bills are more than an expression of economic patriotism. They could have been an effective way of boosting the state’s economy,” said Sweeney, a sponsor of the measures. “The recovery in New Jersey has lagged behind other states, so we should be doing all we can to generate economic growth and to promote economic opportunity.”

But the governor’s action won praise from the New Jersey Business and Industry Association.

“Governor Christie made the right decision,” NJBIA President Michele Siekerka said in a statement. “The bill would be unworkable given the nature of modern global supply chains, which make it difficult to find goods with U.S.-sourced components.”