New Jersey issues regulations allowing companies to place skill-based gambling devices on the floor of the state’s casinos.

The New Jersey Division of Gaming Enforcement (Division) presently posted rules by which manufacturers of skill-based games must operate.

Those prescriptions include prominently letting players know that the outcome of their bet can be influenced by their physical or mental skill as opposed to traditional gambling devices that are based on chance.

“This is another important step towards implementing skill-based gaming in the Atlantic City gaming market,” said Division Director David Rebuck. “Although the Division has had the authority to authorize these games for some time and announced in October 2014 an initiative for manufacturers to bring their skill-based games to New Jersey, the industry requested specific regulations to guide their efforts to create innovative skill-based products.”

The rules include requirements that the games pay out a certain percentage of bets collected, and they prohibit casinos from making the games harder or easier to win while a game is in progress, based on the perceived skill of the player.

They also include monitoring programs to guard against collusion or money laundering in multi-player peer-to-peer games.

Manufacturers say skill-based slot machines are meant to appeal to millennials who tend to skip over traditional machines because they see them as old-fashioned.

Rebuck said that under a fast-track provision, manufacturers who bring their skill-based devices to New Jersey before any other jurisdiction can have them in operation on a casino floor within 14 days of approval.

The rules mirror those adopted last September in Nevada, so any device approved there would be allowed in New Jersey, as well.

 

Two More States Edging Closer to Passing Transportation P3 Legislation

Bills making their way through state legislatures in Tennessee and Kentucky could allow governments in both states to begin developing transportation projects through public-private partnerships. Kentucky’s legislation would allow this procurement method to be used for other public projects as well.

Legislators in Nashville are considering SB 2093, which would authorize local and state governments to pursue P3s and give partners the power to seek loans, purchase rights of way and collect fees. The  bipartisan bill also permits developers to submit unsolicited proposals but includes a 90-day period during which other firms can submit competing proposals.

One project that could be built through a P3 is a $5.4 billion bus rapid transit line connecting Nashville and Clarksville, reported “The Tennessean”. Neither sources of funding nor proposed alternatives have been identified but legislation introduced last year that would allow the metropolitan transit system to charge customers a fuel tax to fund them will be considered this spring.

Kentucky is considering two identical bills that would permit state and local governments to use P3s develop capital projects, such as public roads, bridges and parks. Projects worth more than $25 million would require the General Assembly’s approval, reported CN׀2 Pure Politics.

HB 309 or SB 132 may stand a stronger chance of passing than a similar bill that then-Gov. Steve Beshear vetoed in 2014 because it called for the imposition of tolls to pay for the replacement of Brent Spence Bridge connecting Kentucky and Ohio. The new legislation explicitly prohibits the imposition of tolls on interstate highway projects between the two states.

 

New Jersey Environmental Infrastructure Trust

On Monday a New Jersey Assembly panel advanced a bill that would require local governments and authorities wanting to use New Jersey Environmental Infrastructure Trust funds for projects costing $1 million or more to first obtain a financing cost estimate from the trust.

The Assembly Environment and Waste Committee unanimously approved an amended version of A1649, which was introduced Jan. 27 and marks the latest effort to expand the trust’s oversight of local spending.

“The estimate will enable the local government unit to evaluate, and other interested parties to consider, the potential savings of financing and interest costs offered by trust financing compared to other available methods of financing the project,” the bill statement reads.

The amended version exempts local governments from the requirement if an infrastructure project was approved by ordinance or resolution prior to the bill getting signed into law and also reduces the time frame in which the trust must provide the estimate from 15 days to five.

Sponsored by Assemblywoman L. Grace Spencer, who is the committee’s chair, Assemblywoman Eliana Pintor Marin, D-Essex, and Assemblyman Gary S. Schaer, D-Bergen and Passaic, the legislation drew support from the Utility and Transportation Contractors Association of New Jersey and the Laborers International Union of North America.

Ciro Scalera, the government affairs director for the union, thanked the committee for modifying the bill after hearing from its detractors, such as the New Jersey League of Municipalities.

Under the bill, the NJEIT must provide an online form for the financing cost estimate. Local governments may be asked to provide additional information concerning the project and borrower, including a detailed description of the project, design, engineering and environmental information; a cost estimate prepared by the project engineer or other qualified person; information regarding the borrower; and the amount to be financed.

The legislation has been in the works for two years,.

An initial version introduced by the Assembly in July 2014 received 69-7 approval from that chamber in March after review by its Environment and Solid Waste Committee. The Senate introduced a version in September 2014, left that house’s Environment and Energy Committee along with some amendments.

Both bills were referred to, but never advanced from, the Senate Budget and Appropriations Committee.