Tax Plans & Presidential Candidates

There appears to be at least a theoretical agreement among all Presidential candidates’ that the current Federal tax system is broken — measured by its complexity, inefficiency and disorder.

The field of presidential candidates in both parties is diverse and possibly evolving— as is the eventual tax agenda for 2017 after the election of a new president in November 2016. Obviously, the congressional elections in November 2016 will also have a significant bearing on the specific issues that eventually comprise the tax agenda in the new Congress. Understandably, most candidates have not provided many specifics of their tax reform plans, but a general consensus for comprehensive tax reform appears to be developing on both sides of the aisle.

A number of Republican candidates favor some version of a “flat” tax rate on personal income, with proposals ranging from 10 to 15 percent based on income levels. Sen. Marco Rubio’s (R-Fla.) proposal would implement a 15 percent rate on middle-class earners, with a rate of 35 percent for higher-income taxpayers. Similarly, Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky has proposed a 14.5 percent “flat and fair” tax rate that would apply to all earners and businesses, with the first $50,000 of family income untaxed. Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas has said that he supports a flat tax, but he has not provided details as to a specific rate level. Neurosurgeon Ben Carson has proposed a flat tax rate of 10 percent.

Another priority for Republican candidates appears to be lowering the corporate tax rate to encourage investment in the United States and the repatriation of foreign earnings. Proposals by Rubio and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie would reduce the maximum corporate rate to 25 percent, while former Texas Gov. Rick Perry has proposed a 20 percent rate. Other candidates support lowering the corporate rate but have not given a specific tax level. As stated above, Paul’s plan would apply a 14.5 percent rate to businesses, as well as individuals.

The candidates generally agree that taxes on capital gains and dividends should be lowered or eliminated. In addition, many proposals assert that any revenue loss from reducing tax rates should be offset by restricting or eliminating various tax deductions, with the exception of charitable donations and mortgage interest.

Clinton remains the front-runner of the Democratic field. While she has not released a specific tax plan, Clinton has expressed support for lowering the tax burden on middle-class taxpayers. In addition, Clinton has indicated that, if elected, she would close several business tax “loopholes,” including the current tax treatment of carried interest. Clinton has also stated that she opposes the current tax incentives for oil and gas companies and would seek to end them. That said, she has expressed support for implementing tax incentives to encourage profit-sharing between businesses and their employees and has proposed a $1,500 tax credit for businesses that hire apprentices. Recently, Clinton proposed a comprehensive college affordability plan, financed by a 28 percent cap on itemized deductions similar to the budget proposal advanced by President Barack Obama.

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., appears to be narrowing the gap with Clinton in several national and state-specific polls. With respect to Sanders’ tax policy positions, he has proposed to increase and restructure the estate tax, beginning with a 45 percent rate on estates worth up to $7 million, a 50 percent rate on those worth $7 million to $10 million, and a 55 percent rate on those worth $10 million to $50 million. In addition, Sanders has expressed support for an additional 10 percent surtax on estates valued at more than $1 billion. Sanders has also sponsored legislation that would change the current tax rules for corporate inversions and earnings stripping by foreign companies, and another bill that would prohibit U.S. corporations from deferring federal income taxes on profits of offshore subsidiaries. Like Clinton, Sanders opposes current tax incentives for the oil and gas industry.

Other Democratic presidential candidates, such as former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley and former Sens. Jim Webb of Virginia and Lincoln Chafee of Rhode Island, have all expressed support for lowering individual tax rates generally while not advancing any specific tax plans. The one exception was an open letter written by O’Malley to the financial sector on July 9, 2015, outlining steps that he would take to prevent another major banking crisis. In that letter, he proposes a tax on financial instruments to discourage high-frequency trading and a separate financial transaction tax to discourage speculation.

Martin J. Milita, Jr. Esq., is senior director at Duane Morris Government Strategies, LLC

Visit his blog at: https://martinmilita1.wordpress.com

Follow him on twitter: @MartinMilita1

https://www.facebook.com/martin.milita

http://www.dmgs.com/

Duane Morris Government Strategies (DMGS) supports the growth of organizations, companies, communities and economies through a suite of government and business consulting services. The firm offers a range of government relations and public affairs services, including lobbying, grant writing; development finance consulting, media relations management, grassroots campaigning and community outreach. Milita works at the firm’s Trenton and Newark New Jersey offices.

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Martin Milita

Martin Milita is a Senior Director at Duane Morris Government Strategies, LLC. Duane Morris Government Strategies (DMGS) supports the growth of organizations, companies, communities and economies through a suite of government and business consulting services. The firm offers a range of government relations and public affairs services, including lobbying, grant writing; development finance consulting, media relations management, grassroots campaigning and community outreach. Milita works at the firm’s Trenton and Newark New Jersey offices. Visit his blog at: https://martinmilita1.wordpress.com Follow him on twitter: @MartinMilita1 https://www.facebook.com/martin.milita http://www.dmgs.com/ BLOGROLL Martin Milita – About.me Martin Milita :: Pinterest Martin Milita @ Twitter Martin Milita at Slideshare Martin Milita on Google+ Martin Milita Yola Site Martin Milita | Xing

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